Great Grimsby 10k
22 July 2018
This was the second year that I'd entered the Great Grimsby 10k and I knew that it would be a good race to get a personal best time. Although not exactly flat, the course had no significant hills was on good smooth roads.
I got there at 9am in plenty of time for the race start at 10am, and contacted Darren Edmonds who was also running to meet up. On my way towards the town centre I bumped into Gary Berzins (who I didn't know had entered) and we all made our way to the start line with over three thousand others. With so many there we didn't spot Anton Newell at any time during the day.
Luckily I was on the first wave and started at the front with Gary. It was very hot just standing there and I just wanted to get going.
My aim was to get inside of the forty two minute mark and to run consistent miles at 6 min 45 sec pace. I was also trying to achieve the club bronze time and felt pretty confident of doing it especially as Darren promised to buy me a pint in if I beat my pb.
We got underway and had to keep checking the watch and slow myself down as the pace was sub 6 minutes when I first checked it. I settled down and the first mile went by in 6:20. I felt ok but as I'd raced on Friday evening in the Kegworth 5 mile I wasn't sure if I would last for the entire race. The 40 minute pacers passed me and the thought came into my head that if I latched onto them they'd pull me around. However after about 200 meters I soon realised it was a bad idea. There was no way I could sustain the pace for the remaining distance so I went back to my original plan. A couple more miles went by and it was clear to me that if I didn't do anything stupid (and my left calf that was starting to hurt a little didn't get any worse) I'd achieve my aim.
As the km to go markers counted down and the end was nearly in sight I had the urge to slow up and had to fight with myself to keep it going. My body was screaming for me to stop and looking around I was not the only one in pain.
On the long road back to the town center there was a band playing with lots of drums below a flyover. The sound echoed underneath the structure and was ear splitting. It all added to the experience.
Off the main road now and onto the side road heading for the finish in a large park.
The sound of the loudspeakers could be heard and I knew that the suffering would soon be over. One more push and onto the grassy finishing straight fighting all the way over the line. I'd done it. Not only a pb by two minutes but a club silver standard time.
After receiving t shirts and medals we met up at at a barge that was converted into a bar and heavily listing to one side. It didn't stop the beer tasting like amber nectar.
It was a fantastic day out as well as a superb race. Definitely one for the diary again in 2019.
Great Grimsby 10k
22 July 2018
This was the second year that I'd entered the Great Grimsby 10k and I knew that it would be a good race to get a personal best time. Although not exactly flat, the course had no significant hills and was on good smooth roads.
I got there at 9am in plenty of time for the race start at 10am, and contacted Darren Edmonds who was also running to meet up. On my way towards the town centre I bumped into Gary Berzins (who I didn't know had entered) and we all made our way to the start line with over three thousand others. With so many there we didn't spot Anton Newell at any time during the day.
Luckily I was on the first wave and started at the front with Gary. It was very hot just standing there and I just wanted to get going.
My aim was to get inside of the forty two minute mark and to run consistent miles at 6 min 45 sec pace. I was also trying to achieve the club bronze time and felt pretty confident of doing it especially as Darren promised to get me a pint in if I beat my pb.
We got underway and had to keep checking the watch and slow myself down as the pace was sub 6 minutes when I first checked it. I settled down and the first mile went by in 6:20. I felt ok but as I'd raced on Friday evening in the Kegworth 5 mile I wasn't sure if I would last for the entire race. The 40 minute pacers passed me and the thought came into my head that if I latched onto them they'd pull me around. However after about 200 meters I soon realised it was a bad idea. There was no way I could sustain the pace for the remaining distance so I went back to my original plan. A couple more miles went by and it was clear to me that if I didn't do anything stupid (and my left calf that was starting to hurt a little didn't get any worse) I'd achieve my aim.
As the km to go markers counted down and the end was nearly in sight I had the urge to slow up and had to fight with myself to keep it going. My body was screaming for me to stop and looking around I was not the only one in pain.
On the long road back to the town center there was a band playing with lots of drums below a flyover. The sound echoed underneath the structure and was ear splitting. It all added to the experience.
Off the main road now and onto the side road heading for the finish in a large park.
The sound of the loudspeakers could be heard and I knew that the suffering would soon be over. One more push and onto the grassy finishing straight fighting all the way over the line. I'd done it. Not only a pb by two minutes but a club silver standard time.
After receiving t shirts and medals we met up at at a barge that was converted into a bar and heavily listing to one side. It didn't stop the beer tasting like amber nectar.
It was a fantastic day out as well as a superb race. Definitely one for the diary again in 2019.
Report by Craig Linacre
Gary Berzins 36:44
Craig Linacre 41:20 pb 
Darren Edmonds 41:41
Anton Newell 48:07
There was a very large turn out from the Harriers for the Booth League race at Denby on Tuesday 5th June.
There were some very good performances including Sam Moakes 6th overall and 1st JM, Dean Cross 1st VM50, Nick Luke 2nd VM55, Keith Brown 3rd VM60, Tony Staniland 1st VM70+, Sally Hughes 1st VL45, Claire Watson 3rd SL and Megan Yorke 3rd JL.
Doncaster 5K Road Race
On Thursday 18th July 2018, Kristian Watson and Gary Gerzins represented the Harriers in this event in South Yorkshire organised by Doncaster AC.
The race was held over three laps with a slight hill on an otherwise flat route.
The weather conditions were very muggy for the athletes and the start of the race was extremely fast with both our runners having to really dig in. The quality of the field was very high but Kris upped a gear on the last lap as he moved past some of his rivals to finish in 13th place and only four seconds off a pb with 15:47.
Gary ran brilliantly continuing his excellent form of late with a pb of 17:20 and was 44th.

ESAA 2018 Track & Field Championship

 

The results are in for all four of our athletes representing their counties in this prestigious event over the weekend at the Alexander Stadium in Birmingham.

All performed brilliantly and are a credit to their counties and club.

Rebecca Johns and Felicia Miloro won bronze in the Inter Girls 80m hurdles and Senior Girls Pole Vault respectively, while Alex Arbon threw a personal best in the Javelin and was fourth. Isabelle Skelton made the final in the Junior Girls 300m finishing in seventh place.

Junior girls:

Isabelle Skelton: 300m

Heat - 40.99

Final - 7th - 41.32
 

Alex Arbon - Javelin

Final - 4th - 41.46 PB
 

Inter Girls:

Rebecca Johns: 80m Hurdles

Heat  - 11.20 PB

Semi -  11.34 

Final - 3rd - 11.44 🥉 
 

Senior Girls:

Felicia Miloro : Pole Vault 

Final - 3rd - 3.70 🥉 

From left  to right Rebecca Johns, Isabelle Skelton, Felicia Miloro and Alex Arbon.

Newstead Abbey Dash 5K (incorporating the Nottinghamshire County Championship).
The majestic setting of Newstead Abbey was the venue once again for the race and was bathed in beautiful evening sunshine (unlike last year's event which was held in torrential rain).
Twenty three Harriers competed, many hoping for a medal or a personal best time over the fast course.
Last year's County champion Kristian Watson managed a bronze medal overall this time around. He was pushed extremely hard by Dan Nugent who came in on Kristian's heels only seven seconds back. This performance earned Dan the gold medal for the V35-45 category (also first vet in the open race).
Other superb performances included Charlie Norman who won gold in the U17 category, as well as finishing first in the open race for his age group. Ben Burnham was the gold medal winner in the U20 category, and was also the victor of the U20 category in the open race.
Freya Strom (who ran up the slope to the finish like she was running a track sprint) was our next gold winner, as she took the female U17 prize. Caitlin Elliot who is another of our young talented athletes picked up silver behind Freya. To complete a clean sweep by Sutton in Ashfield athletes, young Lauren Ellis won a very well deserved bronze.
The evergreen (and ever winning) Tony Staniland continued the goldrush with victory in the Vet over 75 category.
Gary Berzins ran strongly and was rewarded with bronze in the Vet 35-45 age group. 
For full resullts click 
Bakewell Pudding Race with two top five places for Sutton
The latest Bakewell Pudding race which started as a road race in 1998 and since morphed into a fell race, was held on Sunday 1st July at 11am in blistering heat. 
Three Harriers (including myself) ran the course of just over six miles.
I arrived in Bakewell in plenty of time with my youngest daughter Imogen, with the intention of getting a good warm up. After paying my £5 entry fee and pinning on the number, I quickly realised that a lengthy jog around the park was going to hinder me rather than help due to the intense heat of the late morning sun. 
I met up with Dean Cross and Emma Cable, with Dean informing us how hard the hills were and to take it easy at the start. Soon afterwards Paul Frith joined us, and then we gathered at the starting line with two minutes to go.
We were soon away running. Paul and Dean soon vanished into the distance and I made my way over the river via a footbridge and out of the park. It was tempting to up the pace but I remembered what Dean had said and ran within myself. The path soon went upwards past the golf course for the first and hardest climb. The path was very narrow, rocky and extremely steep. Runners in front of me started walking due to the severity and I couldn't get past. 
Finally I reached the top where we were sheltered somewhat from the sun in the woods but the terrain was still unforgiving with very rough ground underfoot making every step difficult.
Knowing that there was only one major climb left was no help to my very hot and flagging body, but I hung on in and gritted my teeth desperate not to get caught by another competitor.
Over the top of the last big ascent and I thought it was all plain sailing to the finish. I was mistaken. On the way down via a bridlepath were lots of pony trekkers. Because the path was quite narrow we couldn't run fast past them and in quite a few places had to walk behind until it was safe to pass.
Onto flatish land now and only two miles to the finish. Running past and through farm buildings I could see the church spire at Bakewell. This gave me a little boost and I continued slogging it along the unmade farm roads, through a field and on until  I eventually came to the river Wye. It was the only obstacle left between me and a Bakewell Pudding for finishing.
I leaped into the river watched by a large crowd on the far bank and bounded through the water and nearly fell at one point. After scrambling out and onto the park the finish line was in sight and so were the puddings.
Paul Frith ran like a true mountain goat to finish in a brilliant 2nd place (43:17) and Dean Cross was hot on his heals in 5th (44:04).
I stumbled in with 54:45 in 45th place and the pudding was lovely.
Report by Craig Linacre